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Isaiah’s Vision Of Christ

Isaiah’s Vision Of Christ

July 14, 2024 by Pastor David Hubbard
Passages:Isaiah 6:1-10

Sermon Synopsis

Isaiah 6:1-10
In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the LORD sitting upon a
throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple.
2Above it stood the seraphims: each one had six wings; with twain he
covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he
did fly.
3And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of
hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.
4And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that cried, and the
house was filled with smoke.
5Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of
unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for
mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.
6Then flew one of the seraphims unto me, having a live coal in his
hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar:
7And he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips;
and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged.
8Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who
will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.
9And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand
not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not.
10Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut
their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and
understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed.
ISAIAH’S VISION OF CHRIST
We know little of Isaiah’s history, but it is enough to know that he
was a prophet of God. Today we study just one of a number of
prophecies that he prophesied of Christ. He calls his prophecy the
vision of Isaiah . . .which he saw, meaning that it came from God to
him and was not his own thinking.
Isaiah was indeed a prophet of God, and his prophecies are recorded
in the Book of Isaiah in the Bible. He lived in the kingdom of Judah
and Jerusalem and his prophecies were filled with messages of
hope, restoration, and warnings
1
.
Isaiah’s prophecies were not his own thoughts, but visions given to
him by God, as mentioned from Isaiah 1:1. He called out the sins of
God’s people who were steeped in rebellion
1
. His prophecies were a
mix of condemnation, confrontation, and compassionate pleas for
the people to return to God
1
.
One of the most significant aspects of Isaiah’s prophecies is his
foretelling of the coming Messiah, Jesus Christ. The Book of Isaiah
speaks more of the coming Messiah than any other prophet,
referring to Him over twenty times
12
. These prophecies pointed to
Christ’s glory, His suffering, and His coming millennial Kingdom1
.
For example, Isaiah prophesied that the Messiah would be born of a
virgin and be named Immanuel
34
, come through David’s line
2
, dwell
in Galilee
2
, and that His way would be prepared by a “voice crying in
the wilderness”
3
. Isaiah also prophesied about the Messiah’s
suffering
2
, His death for our sins
2
, and His resurrection
2
.
These prophecies were fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth, marking
Isaiah’s prophecies as a significant part of biblical prophecy and
demonstrating the divine inspiration of the Bible
2
. Isaiah’s
prophecies continue to be studied and revered for their depth and
accuracy.
Jesus Christ visited the earth before He was born into it. Today we
study one such visit as told by Isaiah who saw Him. This was in the
temple of Jerusalem in the year that king Uzziah died–758 B.C.
Uzziah died from leprosy resulting from his rebellion against God.
Jesus appearing on the earth before His birth shows that He existed
then. In his conversion Isaiah found that in Christ was life.
This belief is rooted in several passages in the Bible. For instance, in
John 1:1–18, Christ is identified with a pre-existent divine
hypostasis (substantive reality) called the Logos, which translates
to “word” in Greek
12
.
In the year that King Uzziah died (around 758 B.C.), Isaiah saw the
Lord in the temple of Jerusalem3
. This vision is recorded in Isaiah
6:1. However, interpretations vary on whether the figure Isaiah saw
was indeed a pre-incarnate appearance of Christ
4
.
King Uzziah, also known as Azariah, was a king of Judah who was
struck with leprosy for his disobedience to God
5
. According to the
Bible, Uzziah unlawfully burned incense in the temple, a task
reserved for priests
6
. In response to this act of rebellion, God
afflicted Uzziah with leprosy, and he had the disease until his
death
7
.
The idea that “in Christ was life” is a central theme in Christian
theology. It suggests that spiritual life and salvation are found in
Jesus Christ. This belief is based on passages such as John 14:6,
where Jesus says,
“I am the way and the truth and the life. No one
comes to the Father except through me.”
The pre-existence of Christ is a significant concept in Christian
theology, suggesting that Jesus existed before His earthly life.
Isaiah’s vision in the temple is sometimes interpreted as a
pre-incarnate appearance of Christ, demonstrating His divine
nature. The life found in Christ refers to the spiritual life and
salvation offered through faith in Jesus.
Isaiah 6:1 I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up,
and his train filled the temple.
The Lord was Jesus Christ. The throne was because He is KING OF
KINGS, AND LORD OF LORDS. He is the exalted One, the One before
all things, whose name is above every name.
Isaiah 6:1 is a significant verse in the Bible that marks the
beginning of Isaiah’s prophetic ministry. The verse reads: “In the
year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord sitting on a throne, high
and lifted up, and the train of His robe filled the temple.”
Here’s a deeper explanation:
● “In the year that King Uzziah died”: This refers to a specific
time in the history of Judah. King Uzziah had a long and
distinguished reign, but his life ended tragically. He was
struck with leprosy by God for his pride and for transgressing
against God by entering the temple to burn incense, which was
a duty reserved for priests
12
.
● “I saw the Lord sitting on a throne”: This signifies a vision of
God’s sovereignty and majesty. Despite the death of a great
king, God was still enthroned in heaven, in charge of all
creation
12
.
● “High and lifted up”: This phrase emphasizes God’s
supremacy and transcendence. He is above all things
1
.
● “The train of His robe filled the temple”: The train of the robe
is often seen as a symbol of royalty and glory. The fact that it
filled the temple could signify the overwhelming presence and
glory of God
1
.
This vision had a profound impact on Isaiah, leading him to a deep
conviction of his own sinfulness and the sinfulness of his people,
and ultimately to his calling as a prophet
12
. It’s a powerful reminder
of God’s holiness, sovereignty, and the transformative power of
encountering God.
Isaiah 6:2 Above it–the throne on which the Lord was
sitting–stood the seraphims–a close relationship in which they
had been placed by the Lord–each one had six wings–God’s
ministering angels. They were honoring and worshiping the Lord.
There needs to be more honor and a greater respect and reverence
in our worship to the Lord. With twain he covered his face–he
wanted to see nothing of his own, but to see through the eyes of the
Lord the things to be seen. With twain he covered his feet–he
wanted to walk no way except the way the Lord led,–and with twain
he did fly–in the power by which one is able to rise above the
fleshly desires and deeds of the human and follow the Lord on a
higher plane of living with the Spirit leading.
Here’s a deeper explanation:
● “Above it stood the seraphims”: The term “seraphim” comes
from the Hebrew word “seraph,
” which means “burning
ones” or “fiery ones,
” possibly suggesting a radiant or intense
nature
1
. They are often depicted as fiery, six-winged angels
who stand in the presence of God
1
.
● “Each one had six wings”: The six wings of the seraphim are
significant and symbolic
2345
.
● “With twain he covered his face”: Two of the wings covered
the seraphim’s face, signifying their deep reverence and awe
for God
2345
.
● “With twain he covered his feet”: Two more wings covered
their feet, or the lower part of their form, displaying humility
before God
235
.
● “With twain he did fly”: The last two wings were used for
flying, symbolizing their readiness and swiftness in carrying
out God’s commands
2345
.
The seraphim are known for their proclamation of God’s holiness
with the repeated cry of “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty.”
The imagery of the seraphim in Isaiah’s vision emphasizes the
transcendence and majesty of God
2
. They are not as frequently
mentioned in the Bible as other angelic beings, such as cherubim or
archangels, and their role is primarily associated with worship and
exaltation of God
231
.
Isaiah 6:3 And one cried . . . Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord of hosts. If
the Lord is to be seen high and lifted up there must be seraphims to
cry out. Seraphims are a type of God’s ministering servants, those
who are holy and preach holiness. The message here is Holy God,
Holy Son, Holy Spirit. It is holy all the way through. Nothing short
of a message of holiness will fill the temple of God. It is no wonder
that those who do not believe in holiness or living a holy life are
dead, and their worship is lifeless. The whole earth is full of his
glory. There was so much glory in the temple that the whole earth
appeared to be full of the glory of God. When the temple is filled it
causes these earthen vessels to receive more of His glory than they
can contain.
Here’s a deeper explanation:
The verse describes a vision where seraphim (heavenly beings) are
calling out to each other, saying,
“Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord of
hosts”. This threefold repetition is significant in Hebrew literature,
where such repetition denotes utmost emphasis
1
. It underscores the
absolute holiness of God
1
.
The phrase “the whole earth is full of His glory” suggests that
God’s glory is pervasive, and His divine presence fills the earth
1
.
This can be seen as a proclamation of God’s omnipresence and the
manifestation of His power and majesty in all creation
1
.
This verse also highlights the unity and harmony in the
proclamation of God’s holiness. The seraphim “cried unto
another”
, indicating a shared recognition and declaration of God’s
sanctity
1
.
In the context of Isaiah’s prophecy, this vision served to emphasize
the stark contrast between the holiness of God and the sinfulness of
people, setting the stage for Isaiah’s mission to call the people to
repentance
2
.
This verse, therefore, serves as a powerful reminder of God’s
transcendent holiness, His pervasive presence, and the call for His
creation to recognize and reflect His glory
13
. It’s a call to awareness
and transformation in light of God’s overwhelming holiness and
glory
2
.
Isaiah 6:4 And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that
cried,–The cry of Holy, holy, holy, from a Spirit-filled ministry will
cause the door to the way people live to become more narrow–the
house was filled with smoke–the presence of God. Only holy
preaching will fill the house with the presence of God.
Here’s a bit more context:
In his vision, Isaiah heard the voices of seraphim (heavenly beings)
praising God. Their voices were so powerful that the doorposts and
thresholds of the temple shook
12
. This could be interpreted as a sign
of the immense power of God’s presence
1
.
The phrase “the house was filled with smoke” could have several
interpretations. It could represent the presence of God, as smoke
often does in the Bible
1
. For example, in Exodus 19:18, Mount Sinai
was covered in smoke when God descended upon it. Similarly, in 1
Kings 8:10-11, the temple was filled with a cloud, symbolizing God’s
glory, when the ark of the covenant was brought into the temple
1
.
However, the smoke could also symbolize God’s judgment
1
. In the
context of Isaiah’s vision, the smoke, along with the shaking of the
doorposts, could be seen as a sign of impending judgment. This
interpretation aligns with the overall message of Isaiah, which
includes both warnings of judgment for sin and promises of
restoration
1
.
It’s important to note that interpretations can vary, and the exact
meaning can depend on one’s theological perspective
1
.
Isaiah 6:5 Isaiah, amazed, overwhelmed, looks and listens. This is
Jesus Christ the Lord. He senses His holiness in a flood of new
revelation. It causes him to humble himself in a rush of conviction
of his own sin. Repentance overcomes him. The sight of goodness
condemns sin as no words can. A holy life is the greatest proof of
holy living. When the unsaved see Jesus active in our lives that is
the greatest evangelism which we can have. Woe is me! for
I am undone . . . I am a man of unclean lips . . . for mine eyes have
seen the King, the Lord of hosts. What a contrast! Isaiah, unclean,
dead in sin, did not fit into this glorious scene. When we see Jesus as
He is we see ourselves more nearly as we are.
In this verse, Isaiah is expressing his deep sense of unworthiness
and fear in the presence of God’s holiness
1
.
When Isaiah says,
“Woe is me! for I am undone,
” he is expressing a
deep sense of despair and fear
1
. The term “undone” here can be
understood as being ruined or destroyed
1
. This is Isaiah’s reaction
to seeing the Lord in His glory and holiness
1
.
Isaiah refers to himself as a “man of unclean lips,
” which signifies
that he recognizes his own sinfulness and inadequacy
1
. He also says
that he lives among “a people of unclean lips,
” indicating that he is
part of a sinful and rebellious nation
1
.
The phrase “for mine eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts”
refers to Isaiah’s vision of God on His throne
1
. The “King, the Lord
of hosts” is a title for God that emphasizes His sovereignty and
majesty
1
. Seeing God in this way brought a deep conviction of sin
and a sense of impending judgment
1
.
In summary, this verse captures Isaiah’s profound sense of awe and
fear in the presence of God’s holiness, as well as his recognition of
his own sinfulness and the sinfulness of his people
1
.
Isaiah 6:6-7 Flew one of the seraphims–acting as Christ’s
agent–live coal . . . from off the altar. Coming from the altar where
the sacrifice was offered, which was a type of Jesus’ death on the
Cross, the live coal symbolized His cleansing blood. This hath
touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin
purged. God always meets the true repentance with forgiveness and
cleansing. Cleansing is only by the blood of Christ.
1. Live coal: The live coal is a symbol of purification
2
. In the
context of this passage, the seraphim took the live coal from
the altar
2
.
2. Altar: An altar is a table or platform for the presentation of
religious offerings, for sacrifices, or for other ritualistic
purposes
3
. Altars are found at shrines, temples, churches, and
other places of worship
3
.
3. Laid it upon my mouth: The seraphim touched Isaiah’s mouth
with the live coal
4
. This act is symbolic and represents the
purification process
5
.
4. This hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away,
and thy sin purged: This phrase signifies that Isaiah’s guilt
has been removed and his sins have been atoned for
6
. The
touching of the lips with the live coal symbolizes the cleansing
of Isaiah’s sins and his preparation for prophetic ministry.
In summary, this passage describes a vision in which Isaiah is
purified by a seraphim and prepared for his prophetic mission. The
seraphim uses a live coal from the altar to touch Isaiah’s lips,
symbolizing the removal of his guilt and the atonement of his sins.
This prepares Isaiah to speak the words of God.
Isaiah 6:8 God’s cleansing is just the beginning. Whom shall I send,
and who will go for us? Who are “us”? The Trinity (Father, Son, and
Holy Spirit). God has work to be done and seeks those willing to do
it. As soon as one is cleansed from sin God calls to service. Here am
I; send me–Isaiah heard and gave himself. God does not force, but
invites. He can use only those who consecrate themselves to Him.
True happiness is found only when one yields himself wholly to the
Lord.
Here’s a bit of context and interpretation:
In this chapter, the prophet Isaiah has a vision of the Lord seated on
a throne. The Lord is surrounded by seraphim, heavenly beings,
who are praising Him. Isaiah is overwhelmed by this vision and
acknowledges his own sinfulness and the sinfulness of his people.
Then, one of the seraphim flies to Isaiah with a live coal taken from
the altar, touches Isaiah’s mouth with it and tells him that his guilt
is taken away and his sin atoned for. After this act of purification,
Isaiah hears the voice of the Lord saying,
“Whom shall I send, and
who will go for us?”
This is seen as God looking for a messenger or a prophet to send to
His people. Isaiah, now having been cleansed of his sin, responds to
God’s call by saying,
“Here am I; send me.” This signifies Isaiah’s
willingness and readiness to serve the Lord and deliver His message
to the people.
It’s a powerful verse that many interpret as a call to service and
mission, reminding us to be open and willing to follow God’s call in
our lives. It’s often quoted in religious contexts when discussing
the idea of vocation or divine calling. However, interpretations can
vary based on different theological perspectives.
Isaiah 6:9-10 God had need for a messenger–a prophet, Go, and tell
this people. This is the duty of each messenger today to take
Christ’s message of warning to a sinful people. Lest they see . . . and
hear . . . and understand . . . and convert, and be healed. To see and
hear and understand and obey the message of holiness is the only
way to be healed of sin. Christ is not willing that any should perish.
God gives us the result of our own choice, the fruit of our sowing.
This is a warning to us. It is possible to neglect God’s call until our
ears hear it no more, our minds understand it no more, and we lose
the salvation we once could have had.
Here’s a bit more context on verses 9 and 10:
Isaiah 6:9: “And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye
indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive
not.”
1
Isaiah 6:10: “Make the heart of this people fat, and make their
ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes,
and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and
convert, and be healed.”
1
These verses are not a command from God for the people to be
disobedient and unresponsive. Instead, they are a prediction of the
people’s response to Isaiah’s prophetic message
1
. Despite hearing
the words and seeing the signs, the people of Israel would not
understand or perceive their meaning
1
.
This is a form of judgment upon the people for their persistent
disobedience and rejection of God
1
. Their hearts would become
“fat,
” meaning insensitive or hardened, their ears would become
“heavy,
” meaning they would be dull of hearing, and their eyes
would be shut, meaning they would not see or understand
1
.
The phrase “lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears,
and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed”
suggests that their understanding and perception were necessary
for their repentance and healing
1
. But because of their hardened
hearts, they would not understand Isaiah’s message, and therefore,
they would not turn back to God and be healed
1
.
This passage is quoted in the New Testament by Jesus (Matthew
13:14-15; Mark 4:12), John (John 12:40), and Paul (Acts 28:26-27),
indicating that the same pattern of rejection of God’s message was
still present in their time
1
.
Isaiah 6:1-10 is a significant passage in the Bible, as it describes the
prophet Isaiah’s vision of God and his call to prophetic ministry.
Isaiah 6:1: In the year that King Uzziah died, Isaiah saw the
Lord seated on a throne, high and exalted
1
. The death of King
Uzziah, a significant event in Judah’s history, provides the
historical context for this vision
2
.
Isaiah 6:2-4: Isaiah sees seraphim, heavenly beings, each
with six wings. They were calling to one another,
“Holy, holy,
holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.”
The sound of their voices caused the doorposts and thresholds
to shake, and the temple was filled with smoke
1
.
Isaiah 6:5: Upon seeing this vision, Isaiah becomes acutely
aware of his own sinfulness and the sinfulness of his people.
He exclaims,
“Woe to me! I am ruined! For I am a man of
unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips, and my
eyes have seen the King, the Lord Almighty”
1
.
Isaiah 6:6-7: One of the seraphim then flies to Isaiah with a
live coal taken from the altar. The seraph touches Isaiah’s
mouth with the coal and declares that his guilt is taken away
and his sin atoned for
1
.
Isaiah 6:8: Isaiah hears the voice of the Lord asking,
“Whom
shall I send? And who will go for us?” In response, Isaiah
offers himself for God’s service, saying,
“Here am I. Send
me!”
1
.
Isaiah 6:9-10: God then gives Isaiah a message to deliver to
the people of Israel. The message is a prediction of the
people’s response to Isaiah’s prophetic ministry. Despite
hearing the words and seeing the signs, they would not
understand or perceive their meaning
1
. Their hearts would
become insensitive, their ears would be dull of hearing, and
their eyes would be shut
1
.
This passage is a profound depiction of Isaiah’s encounter with the
divine, his recognition of his own sinfulness, his cleansing and
forgiveness, and his commission to deliver God’s message to
rebellious people
2
.
Closing
As we conclude our study of Isaiah 6:1-10 today, let’s take a
moment to reflect on the profound truths we’ve encountered in this
passage. We’ve seen Isaiah’s awe-inspiring vision of the Lord, high
and exalted, and his humble response to God’s holiness. We’ve
witnessed his confession of sin, his cleansing, and his willing
acceptance of God’s call to deliver a difficult message to a rebellious
people.
This passage challenges us to examine our own hearts. Like Isaiah,
we are called to recognize our sinfulness in the light of God’s
holiness. We are reminded of the grace that cleanses us and the call
that God has placed on each of our lives.
As we go forth this week, let’s strive to hear God’s voice, to respond
to His call, and to faithfully deliver His message to those around us.
May we, like Isaiah, be willing to say,
“Here am I. Send me!”
Let’s pray that our hearts remain sensitive to God’s word, our ears
open to His voice, and our eyes open to His work in our lives and in
the world around us. And may we always remember the grace that
cleanses us and the love that calls us to serve.
Thank you all.

Isaiah 6:1–10

6:1 In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up; and the train of his robe filled the temple. Above him stood the seraphim. Each had six wings: with two he covered his face, and with two he covered his feet, and with two he flew. And one called to another and said:

  “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts;
  the whole earth is full of his glory!”

And the foundations of the thresholds shook at the voice of him who called, and the house was filled with smoke. And I said: “Woe is me! For I am lost; for I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts!”

Then one of the seraphim flew to me, having in his hand a burning coal that he had taken with tongs from the altar. And he touched my mouth and said: “Behold, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away, and your sin atoned for.”

And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” Then I said, “Here I am! Send me.” And he said, “Go, and say to this people:

  “‘Keep on hearing, but do not understand;
  keep on seeing, but do not perceive.’
10   Make the heart of this people dull,
    and their ears heavy,
    and blind their eyes;
  lest they see with their eyes,
    and hear with their ears,
  and understand with their hearts,
    and turn and be healed.”

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